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What A 'Gmaj' Chord Has In Common With A 'Gmaj' Scale Part 2

 

- Over the next few weeks, we'll explore the Gmaj scale in different locations of the fret board, and see how it fits into the Gmaj scale in the same area of the fret board. This will consist of at least three parts.-

 

  This week, we're going to view the Gmaj chord and scale beginning at the third fret.  

FIGURE 1  LISTEN TO IT

  Okay, first let's look at the 'Gmaj' chord at the fifth fret...

       G                   D    G    D    G    B     

  e||--7----------------|----------------------7--------||
  B||--8----------------|-----------------8-------------||
  G||--7----------------|------------7------------------||
  D||--5----------------|-------5-----------------------||
  A||--5----------------|--5----------------------------||
  E||-------------------|-------------------------------||

 

 

  You'll notice in the diagram above and to the left, the note names are given, and so is the fingering.  Beside that, the tabbed out version of the chord, both as a single strummed chord (with the chord name above) and as a single note-picked chord (with the note names above.)  Try to play the tabbed out notes both with a pick and with your fingers.  Were you able to cleanly fret the chord, and pick it cleanly, too?  It's a bit harder to get a clean sound here than in the open position (last week).

 

  Now, how about saying out loud: "Do Ra Me Fa So La Ti Do!"  That's right, we're doing that again this week!

  FIGURE 2  LISTEN TO IT

 

Sing along:"Do Ra Me Fa So La Ti Do    Ra Me Fa So La Ti Do"

NOTE NAMES: A  B  C  D  E  F# G  A     B  C  D  E  F# G  A  B

       e||--------------------------|--------------------5--7--||
       B||--------------------------|-----------5--7--8--------||
       G||--------------------------|--4--5--7-----------------||
       D||-----------------4--5--7--|--------------------------||
       A||-----------5--7-----------|--------------------------||
       E||--5--7--8-----------------|--------------------------||

It can also look like this:  As you can see, I've moved some notes to the 9th and 10th frets!

       e||--------------------------|------------------------7--||
       B||--------------------------|--------------7--8--10-----||
       G||--------------------------|-----5--7--9---------------||
       D||--------------------5--7--|--9------------------------||
       A||-----------5--7--9--------|---------------------------||
       E||--5--7--8-----------------|---------------------------||

   That's the Gmaj scale starting at the 5th fret.  The second example is easier for me!  Can you play it both with a pick and just your fingers?  Again, remember it's more important to get it right than fast, so start of slowly.  Try to play the scale crisply, cleanly, accurately, without hesitation, forwards and backwards, and without looking!  You will be able to speed it up with more practice.

  Now it's time to find a guitar fill in this position.  Before you look below, try pulling something out of the scale on your own.

FIGURE 3  LISTEN TO IT

 

Fingering:     1  3  2  3  1  3  1  3 

          e||--------------------------||
          B||--------8-----------------||
          G||--7--9-----9--7-----7-----||
          D||-----------------9-----9--||
          A||--------------------------||
          E||--------------------------||

 

 

  Although that is something simple, it takes finger control.  The numbers above the tab represent the fingers that I recommend be used to play each note.  (T = Thumb; 1 = First/Pointer; 2 = Middle; 3 = Ring; 4 = Pinky; and  X = None.)  Once you've got that little lick down, try playing the chord in the front and back of the lick.  And when you can do that, we'll get a little fancy!

FIGURE 4  LISTEN TO IT

Fingering:       1  3  2  3  1  3     1  3 

       e||--7----------------------|--------7------------||
       B||--8----------8-----------|--------8------------||
       G||--7----7--9-----9--7-----|--7-----7------------||
       D||--5-------------------9--|-----9--5------------||
       A||--5----------------------|--------5------------||
       E||-------------------------|---------------------||

 

  Now by using the fingering given, your hand stays in the same location which means your fingers do the moving.  At times, to get a different effect on a note, you have to use different fingering.  FIGURE 5 plays the same pattern, but this time I incorporate two slides.  This is another way to  give the notes character.  Try sliding them with the fingering given in FIGURE 4, then you'll understand why the fingering has changed!  You may find that you like the original fingering better, but I found that when using the slide technique to play these notes, I was more comfortable using my middle finger.

FIGURE 5  LISTEN TO IT

Fingering:  2  2  1  2  2  3     1  2 

  e||--7----------------------|--------7------------||
  B||--8----------8-----------|--------8------------||
  G||--7----7/-9-----9\-7-----|--7-----7------------||
  D||--5-------------------9--|-----9--5------------||
  A||--5----------------------|--------5------------||
  E||-------------------------|---------------------||

 

FIGURE 6  LISTEN TO IT

  Okay, here's another descending pattern very similar to the one above.  In fact, the only difference besides the note spacing is the last couple of notes....I added some new ones. 

 

e||-------------------------------|----------7----------||
B||--------8~---------------------|----------8----------||
G||--7r-9-------9--7-----7--------|----------7----------||
D||-------------------9-----9--7--|----------5----------||
A||-------------------------------|--7---5---5----------||
E||-------------------------------|---------------------||

 

 

  Can you believe the difference that note spacing can make?  The red notes are triplet 8th notes, and the blue ones are dotted 8th notes.  Doesn't that add a different feel to the fill?

  Now,  practice getting back to the original chord as soon as you're finished with the lick.  Go back to the first lesson and compare both chords and scales.  How do they sound alike?  How do they sound differently?  Over the next few days, play around with both scales and see what little licks you can create.  Remember to take it slowly, accuracy counts!  See you next week!

 

 

 

 

 

 

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